Malachite is a gorgeous green banded stone, with colours of the bands ranging from light green to a very dark green. It is very easily recognised, and has a distinctive, attractive look. Its name comes from old Greek, meaning “mallow-coloured stone”, after the Mallow plant. It has been called the “mirror of the soul”, and […]

> View article

Moonstone is a gemstone in the feldspar family. The Romans believed that it was made from solidified rays from the moon. It has a beautiful shimmery look, called adularescence, from which it got its name. The effect is caused by reflections from alternating layers of two minerals called orthoclase and albite. (In the images, the […]

> View article

Emerald is one of the earliest known coloured gemstones, having been prized since antiquity. Its name comes from the Greek word “Smaragdus” which means green. The earliest known emerald mines were in Egypt, about 3000BC, from a location near the Red Sea that would later be known as “Cleopatra’s mines”. Cleopatra was known to have […]

> View article

In the Victorian era it was common to make a piece of jewellery to remember family members who had passed on. Sometimes these would be lockets, with a portrait of the person, or a lock of their hair. In other cases, it would be a brooch or a ring. Often the pieces would be made […]

> View article

This post is about opals, their sources, and what to look for in a good opal. To view the opal rings we have for sale, click here: Weldons Opal Rings for sale   Opals are among the most intriguing and visually stunning gemstones known to man. In ancient Rome, the opal symbolised love and hope. The Romans called […]

> View article

The Hastings Diamond is a large Golconda diamond, weighing 101 carats. It was named after the British Governor general of India, Warren Hastings. It was given to King George III in 1785, the gift of Nizam Ali Khan, the ruler of Hyderabad. Hastings was at the time on trial in London for what were rather […]

> View article

On a comparative scale, Cork silver is much rarer than Dublin silver. However, there was silversmithing going on in other towns around Ireland, including Galway, Kilkenny, Limerick and Kinsale. These are all incredibly rare, and highly valuable. (Technically, much of the work produced in these towns would not be considered silver, as they were never […]

> View article

Here is a few of the terms that jewellers and gemmologists use, and their meanings: A jour: a type of setting which allows light to enter the pavilion of a faceted stone Adularescence: The appearance of a floaty, billowy light in cabochon gemstones, or a stationary sheen on the flat surface of a stone Ajouré: […]

> View article

With the advent of high tech spectroscopic equipment, more and more testing is done on diamonds. One recent branch of diamond study is the notion of “type” of diamond. What is diamond type? Diamond type refers to the make-up of the diamond crystal; pure diamond is 100% carbon atoms, arranged in a very regular, repeating […]

> View article

Sometimes we get asked by a customer if the stone that they found tucked at the bottom of their jewellery box is a real diamond or not. One very quick way to rule out many fakes is to try the newspaper test. Diamonds are highly dispersive, and have a high refractive index. This means that […]

> View article