Today, most diamonds are cut as round brilliant cuts. This is a circular, symmetrical cut, where every facet (apart from the top facet or “table”) is either a triangle or kite shape. However, for hundreds of years, the most common shape of diamond was a cushion cut. It can be considered the predecessor of today’s modern round […]

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We have just acquired this gold Claddagh Ring made by Richard Joyce of Galway circa 1700 which is about the time of the origin of the Irish Claddagh ring. Claddagh was a fishing village on the Western edge of Galway city in Ireland. Richard Joyce was very young when he embarked on a voyage to […]

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Some of the world’s most famous diamonds are not as bright “in the flesh” as they may seem in photographs. A visit to the Tower of London to see the Star of Africa is slightly disappointing, as the high security means that the light is poor, and the diamond fails to sparkle as well as […]

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While being flawless is highly desirable in a diamond, sometimes the inclusions in a coloured stone can be a good thing; they share information about the origin and nature of the stone, and allow us to easily confirm that the stone is not a synthetic. The image below is a magnification of a 7.89 carat […]

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Diamond clarity relates to the existence and appearance of minature marks within and on the surface of a diamond. All diamonds contain minute flaws and marks, generally traces of their formation. Internal marks are generally called “flaws”, and surface marks are called “blemishes”. These are graded according to their magnitude, on a scale that runs […]

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Determining the clarity of a diamond Diamonds are commonly graded according to “The 4 C’s”; these are Colour, Cut, Carat and Clarity. Clarity refers to the degree of purity if the diamond, specifically whether or not there are “flaws” in the diamond. A diamond of high clarity will have few or no “flaws”, a diamond […]

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Irish silversmiths have to register with the Dublin assay office, and submit an example of their maker’s mark; this allows one to research who made a particular piece, and when. Many records were lost during the civil war, but various researchers have assembled lists of makers, giving us an almost comprehensive list of all the […]

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The name “Golconda” leaves even experienced diamond dealers struggling to describe the beauty and magnificence that these stones exhibit. They are among the whitest and purest diamonds in the world, and are incredibly rare. The Golconda region is in small corner of India, near the region of Hyderabad. For many years, until discoveries in Brazil […]

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This interesting article has just been published, explaining how it is possible to polish a diamond, despite it being the hardest natural substance known to man. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129111742.htm?sms_ss=facebook&at_xt=4d392eb850211ff5%2C0 In layman’s terms, the speed of the polishing wheels causes a glass-like layer to form on the surface of the diamond, which is then chipped off by the […]

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Sapphires have been known and loved by people for thousands of years. The Ancient Greeks believed that the world’s first ring contained a sapphire. Rulers of Ancient Persia believed that the sky had been painted blue by the reflection of sapphires. Others wore it for protection while travelling. They have a life and depth of […]

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