Category: Learn about diamonds

The Cullian III and Cullinan IV are the third and fourth largest stones cut from the largest diamond ever found, the 3,106 carat Cullinan Diamond. (The largest diamond produced from it is The Star of Africa). Cullinan III is a 94 carat pear shape diamond and Cullinan IV is a 63 carat square cut brilliant diamond, also known […]

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The Dresden Green Diamond is one of the rarest diamonds in the world, both in terms of its characteristics and of its provenance. Perhaps only the Hope Diamond can match its wonderfully documented history. It is a modified pear shape brilliant cut diamond weighing approximately 41 carats, and is the largest natural green diamond ever […]

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The Shah Jahan diamond is a 56 carat table cut diamond, flat in general shape, perhaps (probably?) originally a cleavage piece that had been faceted. It is two inches long, btu only one-eighth of an inch thick. It has two drill holes, to allow wire or cord to be passed through, enabling it to be […]

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One of the most famous diamonds of the modern era is the Taylor Burton diamond, a 69 carat pear shape stone, D colour and Flawless clarity, named after perhaps the most famous Hollywood couple of the 20th century, Elizabeth Taylor and Ricard Burton. Taylor and Burton met and fell in the love during the filming […]

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Iolite is a precious gemstone form of cordierite, named after the French geologist Pierre Louis Cordier in 1813. It is a blue to violet colour, similar to Sapphire or Tanzanite. With a hardness of 7 to 7.5, it is softer than sapphire, but harder than tanzanite.  Its name comes from the Greek words Ios, meaning […]

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Most diamonds are found underground, in a host rock called Kimberlite. This was called after the town of Kimberly, in South Africa, the place where this diamondiferous rock was first identified in the late 19th century. Kimberlite is an igneous rock, usually dark in colour. It occurs in carrot-shaped vertical pipes in the Earth’s crust, […]

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The Condé Pink Diamond (also known as Le Grand Condé) is a light pink pear-shaped stone of 9.01 carats, named after  Louis II de Bourbon, the Prince of Condé. He was Commander of the French Army, and is believed to have been presented the diamond as a token of appreciation by King Louis XIII in […]

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Sometimes the value of an item is above and beyond the mere sum of its parts, and a particularly good example is the engagement ring given in 1796 by a young French soldier to his fiancée. Napoleon Bonaparte was only 26 years of age at the time; Josephine was a 32 year old widow, whose first […]

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One of the rarest gemstones in the world, very few samples of Taaffeite are known, although there are probably more specimens out there that have been mistaken for spinel. It was discovered in 1945 by Richard Taaffe, an Irish gemmologist and son of Viscount Henry Taaffe.  In October of 1945, he was examining a parcel […]

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Although I find myself saying this a lot, the Beau Sancy must surely be one of the most beautiful diamonds in the world, a perfect combination of technical skill, artistic beauty, impeccable provenance and documented history. A modified pear shape double rose cut diamond, with the facets centred on an eight sided star, it weighs […]

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